Last edited by Volar
Friday, May 15, 2020 | History

5 edition of Slave trade trail around central Bristol found in the catalog.

Slave trade trail around central Bristol

Madge Dresser

Slave trade trail around central Bristol

by Madge Dresser

  • 350 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by Bristol Museums & Art Gallery in Bristol .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementMadge Dresser,Caletta Jordan,Doreen Taylor.
ContributionsJordan, Caletta., Taylor, Doreen.
The Physical Object
Pagination21cm.28. 38ill.
Number of Pages38
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18421881M
ISBN 100900199423
OCLC/WorldCa41833234

Black History Resource Working Group, Slavery: An Introduction To The African Holocaust, Liverpool, Bristol Museums and Art Gallery, Bristol and Transatlantic Slavery, Bristol, Bristol Museums and Art Gallery, Slave Trade Trail around central Bristol, Bristol, Carswell, J. (). Remembering Slavery and Abolition in Bristol. Slavery & Abolition: Vol. 30, Remembering Slave Trade Abolitions: Reflections on in International Perspective, pp. Cited by:

  My final year film made at UWE, exploring the links between buildings uses and their connections to the slave trade. My focus was on the night club . Retracing Slavery’s Trail of Tears the two became the undisputed tycoons of the domestic slave trade, with an economic impact that is hard to overstate. and all around her are artifacts.

A page from the log book of the Black Prince, a slave ship sailing out of Bristol in A page from the log book of the Black Prince, a slave ship sailing out of Bristol in This page notes that there are slaves on board. The Slave Trade Trail. Explore Bristol's associations with the slave trade, including famous figures and true stories from hundreds of years ago. The tour should take you approximately 1 - 2 hours to complete. Where does it start? The trail starts on College Green at the bottom of Park Street and ends at The Ostrich pub on the harbourside.


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Slave trade trail around central Bristol by Madge Dresser Download PDF EPUB FB2

Bristol & Clifton Slave Trade Trails Hardcover – Septem Learn about Author Central. Terry Townsend (Author) out of 5 stars 2 ratings.

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Hardcover, Septem /5(2).

The Bristol Slavery Trail. Representations of Slavery in Bristol’s Streets: Walking the Bristol Slavery Trail. To do this walk with a mine of information, make sure you buy or borrow a copy of SLAVE TRADE TRAIL around central BRISTOL £ ISBN 0 42.

Buy Slave Trade Trail Around Central Bristol by Dresser, Madge, etc. (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Madge Dresser, etc.

The sugar was transported back to Bristol and then processed in the city. Anyone who bought sugar (or tea) at the time was implicated in the trade.

Bristol was a rich city, and the slave trade made it even wealthier. The interlinked sugar, glass and slave trades brought Bristol work and. The Slave Trade Trail explores Bristol's associations with slavery, and involves the physical movement of tourists through the built environment as they visit sites particularly associated with the.

The Slave Trade Trail around Central Bristol demonstrates this, showing which buildings and houses can be linked to the slave trade. (This trail is published in a leaflet format, for details see the Bibliography in the Learning and Resources section of this site.

The trail can also be viewed on a website, which can be found through External Links in Learning and Resources). The Slave Trade Trail explores Bristol's associations with slavery, and involves the physical movement of tourists through the built environment as they visit sites particularly associated with the by: 4.

The Treasure Island Trail is a walk around the Floating Harbour highlighting Bristol's connections with Treasure Island and other works including Robinson Crusoe and Gulliver's Travels. This extended walk will also take in some of the main landmarks associated with the Transatlantic slave trade. Bristol is a city in the South West of England, on the River Avon which flows into the Severn e of Bristol’s position on the River Avon, it has been an important location for marine trade for centuries.

The city's involvement with the slave trade peaked between andwhen it became the leading slaving port. Bristol is over years old.

It has been a city for over years. Its involvement with the Transatlantic slave trade lasted just over years from around the 's to the early 's. So the history of Bristol is not just about the enslavement of Africans. Nor was Bristol the only slaving port in Britain.

The materials for schools draw on original historic source materials on the Transatlantic Slave Trade related to Bristol, provide a range of materials for teachers/educators and learners. Other Type: Other: Publication Date: Jan 1, Peer Reviewed: Not Peer Reviewed: APA6 Citation: Smart, D.

Bristol slavery trail: Keywords: slavery Cited by: 1. The Transatlantic Slave Trade lasted a relatively short time in Bristol’s history as a trading port, but the impact it had on the city in the 18th century remains evident today.

Students will: Investigate historic objects and other evidence to explore contemporary attitudes and opinions towards the slave trade. Walking Bristol’s slave trade For more great walks, trails and viewpoints, be sure to check out the new Discovering Britain Facebook page by clicking here.

T he statue of Edward Colston in central Bristol looks at ease considering the debate surrounding him. His relaxed pose, face resting on palm, has become symbolic of a city-wide controversy.

As '12 Years a Slave' reminds cinema-goers of the terrible trade, a walk through Bristol reveals how the splendid Georgian townhouses were financed by the suffering of west AfricansAuthor: Jamie Doward. Dyer as part of the support for the exhibition, ‘A Respectable Trade, Bristol and Transatlantic slavery’ at Bristol City Museum in which was an element in the New Opportunities Fund Port Cities project.

A well researched and excellent description of walks around Bristol highlighting the complicity of many of the "worthy" members of society, including the clergy, who benefited from the slave trade or supported it.

The book doesn't hold any punches about the guilt of those who were responsible - /5(3). The Slave Trade Act was the result of a long campaign fought against bitter resistance, to bring to an end four hundred years of profit for a few and hell for many. To Western historians, it was known as the triangular trade, or Atlantic trade.

To Africans it has become known as Maafa, the Kiswahili word for 'holocaust' or 'great disaster'.Price: $ This book presents the drama of that period through six discovery trails. Maps, detailed directions and over photographs help bring the story to life. From the historic habourside to the heights of Clifton; from the interior of a slave owner’s house to the secret caves, courts and corners of the old city, this is a face of Bristol largely.

The Bristol Slavery and Abolition Trail £ This book was produced to celebrate the bicentenary of the abolition of the slave trade in Britain. Unlike other publications, it makes no attempt to name and shame dead Bristolians, but describes many aspects of slavery and abolition and puts them into the context of the time.

Bristol’s official involvement in the transatlantic slave trade started in when the London-based Royal African Company’s monopoly on the trade was ended.

It’s worth noting that one member of the Royal African Company was the merchant Edward Colston, an Anglican Tory, famed for his generosity to Bristol charities. The Sweet History?

trail around Central Bristol demonstrates this, showing some of the buildings and houses that can be linked to the slave trade. During the 18th century, Bristol grew very quickly (the population in was ab but by the end of the century it had risen to ab).

The increase of the population was probably partly because there was lots of new work available in the .Over thirty thousand slaves were brought to the shores of colonial America on ships owned and captained by James DeWolf. When the United States took action to abolish slavery, this Bristol native manipulated the legal system and became actively involved in Rhode Island politics in order to pursue his trading ventures.Six centres have been identified along the central slave route to include Bagamoyo, Mamboya, Mpwapwa, Kilimatinde, Kwihara and Ujiji Bagamoyo Due to its location along the Indian Ocean and being a major harbor and town along the coast of Tanzania that played a key role in the East Africa Slave trade; Bagamoyo is a “place of memory” for.